13.1. csv — Lecture et écriture de fichiers CSV

Nouveau dans la version 2.3.

The so-called CSV (Comma Separated Values) format is the most common import and export format for spreadsheets and databases. There is no « CSV standard », so the format is operationally defined by the many applications which read and write it. The lack of a standard means that subtle differences often exist in the data produced and consumed by different applications. These differences can make it annoying to process CSV files from multiple sources. Still, while the delimiters and quoting characters vary, the overall format is similar enough that it is possible to write a single module which can efficiently manipulate such data, hiding the details of reading and writing the data from the programmer.

Le module csv implémente des classes pour lire et écrire des données tabulaires au format CSV. Il vous permet de dire « écris ces données dans le format préféré par Excel » ou « lis les données de ce fichier généré par Excel », sans connaître les détails précis du format CSV utilisé par Excel. Vous pouvez aussi décrire les formats CSV utilisés par d’autres application ou définir vos propres spécialisations.

Les objets reader et writer du module csv lisent et écrivent des séquences. Vous pouvez aussi lire/écrire les données dans un dictionnaire en utilisant les classes DictReader et DictWriter.

Note

This version of the csv module doesn’t support Unicode input. Also, there are currently some issues regarding ASCII NUL characters. Accordingly, all input should be UTF-8 or printable ASCII to be safe; see the examples in section Exemples.

Voir aussi

PEP 305 - Interface des fichiers CSV
La proposition d’amélioration de Python (PEP) qui a proposé cet ajout au langage.

13.1.1. Contenu du module

Le module csv définit les fonctions suivantes :

csv.reader(csvfile, dialect='excel', **fmtparams)

Return a reader object which will iterate over lines in the given csvfile. csvfile can be any object which supports the iterator protocol and returns a string each time its next() method is called — file objects and list objects are both suitable. If csvfile is a file object, it must be opened with the “b” flag on platforms where that makes a difference. An optional dialect parameter can be given which is used to define a set of parameters specific to a particular CSV dialect. It may be an instance of a subclass of the Dialect class or one of the strings returned by the list_dialects() function. The other optional fmtparams keyword arguments can be given to override individual formatting parameters in the current dialect. For full details about the dialect and formatting parameters, see section Dialectes et paramètres de formatage.

Each row read from the csv file is returned as a list of strings. No automatic data type conversion is performed.

Un court exemple d’utilisation :

>>> import csv
>>> with open('eggs.csv', 'rb') as csvfile:
...     spamreader = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter=' ', quotechar='|')
...     for row in spamreader:
...         print ', '.join(row)
Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam, Baked Beans
Spam, Lovely Spam, Wonderful Spam

Modifié dans la version 2.5: The parser is now stricter with respect to multi-line quoted fields. Previously, if a line ended within a quoted field without a terminating newline character, a newline would be inserted into the returned field. This behavior caused problems when reading files which contained carriage return characters within fields. The behavior was changed to return the field without inserting newlines. As a consequence, if newlines embedded within fields are important, the input should be split into lines in a manner which preserves the newline characters.

csv.writer(csvfile, dialect='excel', **fmtparams)

Return a writer object responsible for converting the user’s data into delimited strings on the given file-like object. csvfile can be any object with a write() method. If csvfile is a file object, it must be opened with the “b” flag on platforms where that makes a difference. An optional dialect parameter can be given which is used to define a set of parameters specific to a particular CSV dialect. It may be an instance of a subclass of the Dialect class or one of the strings returned by the list_dialects() function. The other optional fmtparams keyword arguments can be given to override individual formatting parameters in the current dialect. For full details about the dialect and formatting parameters, see section Dialectes et paramètres de formatage. To make it as easy as possible to interface with modules which implement the DB API, the value None is written as the empty string. While this isn’t a reversible transformation, it makes it easier to dump SQL NULL data values to CSV files without preprocessing the data returned from a cursor.fetch* call. Floats are stringified with repr() before being written. All other non-string data are stringified with str() before being written.

Un court exemple d’utilisation :

import csv
with open('eggs.csv', 'wb') as csvfile:
    spamwriter = csv.writer(csvfile, delimiter=' ',
                            quotechar='|', quoting=csv.QUOTE_MINIMAL)
    spamwriter.writerow(['Spam'] * 5 + ['Baked Beans'])
    spamwriter.writerow(['Spam', 'Lovely Spam', 'Wonderful Spam'])
csv.register_dialect(name, [dialect, ]**fmtparams)

Associate dialect with name. name must be a string or Unicode object. The dialect can be specified either by passing a sub-class of Dialect, or by fmtparams keyword arguments, or both, with keyword arguments overriding parameters of the dialect. For full details about the dialect and formatting parameters, see section Dialectes et paramètres de formatage.

csv.unregister_dialect(name)

Supprime le dialecte associé à name depuis le registre des dialectes. Une Error est levée si name n’est pas un nom de dialecte enregistré.

csv.get_dialect(name)

Return the dialect associated with name. An Error is raised if name is not a registered dialect name.

Modifié dans la version 2.5: This function now returns an immutable Dialect. Previously an instance of the requested dialect was returned. Users could modify the underlying class, changing the behavior of active readers and writers.

csv.list_dialects()

Renvoie les noms de tous les dialectes enregistrés.

csv.field_size_limit([new_limit])

Renvoie la taille de champ maximale courante autorisée par le parseur. Si new_limit est donnée, elle devient la nouvelle limite.

Nouveau dans la version 2.5.

Le module csv définit les classes suivantes :

class csv.DictReader(csvfile, fieldnames=None, restkey=None, restval=None, dialect='excel', *args, **kwds)

Create an object which operates like a regular reader but maps the information read into a dict whose keys are given by the optional fieldnames parameter. The fieldnames parameter is a sequence whose elements are associated with the fields of the input data in order. These elements become the keys of the resulting dictionary. If the fieldnames parameter is omitted, the values in the first row of the csvfile will be used as the fieldnames. If the row read has more fields than the fieldnames sequence, the remaining data is added as a sequence keyed by the value of restkey. If the row read has fewer fields than the fieldnames sequence, the remaining keys take the value of the optional restval parameter. Any other optional or keyword arguments are passed to the underlying reader instance.

Un court exemple d’utilisation :

>>> import csv
>>> with open('names.csv') as csvfile:
...     reader = csv.DictReader(csvfile)
...     for row in reader:
...         print(row['first_name'], row['last_name'])
...
Baked Beans
Lovely Spam
Wonderful Spam
class csv.DictWriter(csvfile, fieldnames, restval='', extrasaction='raise', dialect='excel', *args, **kwds)

Create an object which operates like a regular writer but maps dictionaries onto output rows. The fieldnames parameter is a sequence of keys that identify the order in which values in the dictionary passed to the writerow() method are written to the csvfile. The optional restval parameter specifies the value to be written if the dictionary is missing a key in fieldnames. If the dictionary passed to the writerow() method contains a key not found in fieldnames, the optional extrasaction parameter indicates what action to take. If it is set to 'raise' a ValueError is raised. If it is set to 'ignore', extra values in the dictionary are ignored. Any other optional or keyword arguments are passed to the underlying writer instance.

Note that unlike the DictReader class, the fieldnames parameter of the DictWriter is not optional. Since Python’s dict objects are not ordered, there is not enough information available to deduce the order in which the row should be written to the csvfile.

Un court exemple d’utilisation :

import csv

with open('names.csv', 'w') as csvfile:
    fieldnames = ['first_name', 'last_name']
    writer = csv.DictWriter(csvfile, fieldnames=fieldnames)

    writer.writeheader()
    writer.writerow({'first_name': 'Baked', 'last_name': 'Beans'})
    writer.writerow({'first_name': 'Lovely', 'last_name': 'Spam'})
    writer.writerow({'first_name': 'Wonderful', 'last_name': 'Spam'})
class csv.Dialect

La classe Dialect est une classe de conteneurs utilisée principalement pour ses attributs, qui servent à définir des paramètres pour des instances spécifiques de reader ou writer.

class csv.excel

La classe excel définit les propriétés usuelles d’un fichier CSV généré par Excel. Elle est enregistrée avec le nom de dialecte 'excel'.

class csv.excel_tab

La classe excel_tab définit les propriétés usuelles d’un fichier CSV généré par Excel avec des tabulations comme séparateurs. Elle est enregistrée avec le nom de dialecte 'excel-tab'.

class csv.Sniffer

La classe Sniffer est utilisée pour déduire le format d’un fichier CSV.

La classe Sniffer fournit deux méthodes :

sniff(sample, delimiters=None)

Analyse l’extrait donné (sample) et renvoie une sous-classe Dialect reflétant les paramètres trouvés. Si le paramètre optionnel delimiters est donné, il est interprété comme une chaîne contenant tous les caractères valides de séparation possibles.

has_header(sample)

Analyse l’extrait de texte (présumé être au format CSV) et renvoie True si la première ligne semble être une série d’en-têtes de colonnes.

Un exemple d’utilisation de Sniffer :

with open('example.csv', 'rb') as csvfile:
    dialect = csv.Sniffer().sniff(csvfile.read(1024))
    csvfile.seek(0)
    reader = csv.reader(csvfile, dialect)
    # ... process CSV file contents here ...

Le module csv définit les constantes suivantes :

csv.QUOTE_ALL

Indique aux objets writer de délimiter tous les champs par des guillemets.

csv.QUOTE_MINIMAL

Indique aux objets writer de ne délimiter ainsi que les champs contenant un caractère spécial comme delimiter, quotechar ou n’importe quel caractère de lineterminator.

csv.QUOTE_NONNUMERIC

Indique aux objets writer de délimiter ainsi tous les champs non-numériques.

Indique au lecteur de convertir tous les champs non délimités par des guillemets vers des float.

csv.QUOTE_NONE

Indique aux objets writer de ne jamais délimiter les champs par des guillemets. Quand le delimiter courant apparaît dans les données, il est précédé sur la sortie par un caractère escapechar. Si escapechar n’est pas précisé, le transcripteur lèvera une Error si un caractère nécessitant un échappement est rencontré.

Indique au reader de ne pas opérer de traitement spécial sur les guillemets.

Le module csv définit les exceptions suivantes :

exception csv.Error

Levée par les fonctions du module quand une erreur détectée.

13.1.2. Dialectes et paramètres de formatage

Pour faciliter la spécification du format des entrées et sorties, les paramètres de formatage spécifiques sont regroupés en dialectes. Un dialecte est une sous-classe de Dialect avec un ensemble de méthodes spécifiques et une méthode validate(). Quand un objet reader ou writer est créé, vous pouvez spécifier une chaîne ou une sous-classe de Dialect comme paramètre dialect. En plus du paramètre dialect, ou à sa place, vous pouvez aussi préciser des paramètres de formatage individuels, qui ont les mêmes noms que les attributs de Dialect définis ci-dessous.

Les dialectes supportent les attributs suivants :

Dialect.delimiter

Une chaîne d’un seul caractère utilisée pour séparer les champs. Elle vaut ',' par défaut.

Dialect.doublequote

Contrôle comment les caractères quotechar dans le champ doivent être retranscrits. Quand ce paramètre vaut True, le caractère est doublé. Quand il vaut False, le caractère escapechar est utilisé comme préfixe à quotechar. Il vaut True par défaut.

En écriture, si doublequote vaut False et qu’aucun escapechar n’est précisé, une Error est levée si un quotechar est trouvé dans le champ.

Dialect.escapechar

Une chaîne d’un seul caractère utilisée par le transcripteur pour échapper delimiter si quoting vaut QUOTE_NONE, et pour échapper quotechar si doublequote vaut False. À la lecture, escapechar retire toute signification spéciale au caractère qui le suit. Elle vaut par défaut None, ce qui désactive l’échappement.

Dialect.lineterminator

La chaîne utilisée pour terminer les lignes produites par un writer. Elle vaut par défaut '\r\n'.

Note

La classe reader est codée en dur pour reconnaître '\r' et '\n' comme marqueurs de fin de ligne, et ignorer lineterminator. Ce comportement pourrait changer dans le futur.

Dialect.quotechar

Une chaîne d’un seul caractère utilisée pour délimiter les champs contenant des caractères spéciaux, comme delimiter ou quotechar, ou contenant un caractère de fin de ligne. Elle vaut '"' par défaut.

Dialect.quoting

Contrôle quand les guillemets doivent être générés par le transcripteur et reconnus par le lecteur. Il peut prendre comme valeur l’une des constantes QUOTE_* (voir la section Contenu du module) et vaut par défaut QUOTE_MINIMAL.

Dialect.skipinitialspace

Quand il vaut True, les espaces suivant directement delimiter sont ignorés. Il vaut False par défaut.

Dialect.strict

Quand il vaut True, une exception Error est levée lors de mauvaises entrées CSV. Il vaut False par défaut.

13.1.3. Objets lecteurs

Les objets lecteurs (instances de DictReader ou objets renvoyés par la fonction reader()) ont les méthodes publiques suivantes :

csvreader.next()

Return the next row of the reader’s iterable object as a list, parsed according to the current dialect.

Les objets lecteurs ont les attributs publics suivants :

csvreader.dialect

Une description en lecture seule du dialecte utilisé par le parseur.

csvreader.line_num

Le nombre de lignes lues depuis l’itérateur source. Ce n’est pas équivalent au nombre d’enregistrements renvoyés, puisque certains enregistrements peuvent s’étendre sur plusieurs lignes.

Nouveau dans la version 2.5.

Les objets DictReader ont les attributs publics suivants :

csvreader.fieldnames

S’il n’est pas passé comme paramètre à la création de l’objet, cet attribut est initialisé lors du premier accès ou quand le premier enregistrement est lu depuis le fichier.

Modifié dans la version 2.6.

13.1.4. Objets transcripteurs

Writer objects (DictWriter instances and objects returned by the writer() function) have the following public methods. A row must be a sequence of strings or numbers for Writer objects and a dictionary mapping fieldnames to strings or numbers (by passing them through str() first) for DictWriter objects. Note that complex numbers are written out surrounded by parens. This may cause some problems for other programs which read CSV files (assuming they support complex numbers at all).

csvwriter.writerow(row)

Écrit le paramètre row vers le fichier associé au transcripteur, formaté selon le dialecte courant.

csvwriter.writerows(rows)

Écrit tous les paramètres rows (une liste d’objets row comme décrits précédemment) vers le fichier associé au transcripteur, formatés selon le dialecte courant.

Les objets transcripteurs ont les attributs publics suivants :

csvwriter.dialect

Une description en lecture seule du dialecte utilisé par le transcripteur.

Les objets DictWriter ont les attributs publics suivants :

DictWriter.writeheader()

Écrit une ligne contenant les noms de champs (comme spécifiés au constructeur).

Nouveau dans la version 2.7.

13.1.5. Exemples

Le plus simple exemple de lecture d’un fichier CSV :

import csv
with open('some.csv', 'rb') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    for row in reader:
        print row

Lire un fichier avec un format alternatif :

import csv
with open('passwd', 'rb') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f, delimiter=':', quoting=csv.QUOTE_NONE)
    for row in reader:
        print row

Le plus simple exemple d’écriture correspondant est :

import csv
with open('some.csv', 'wb') as f:
    writer = csv.writer(f)
    writer.writerows(someiterable)

Enregistrer un nouveau dialecte :

import csv
csv.register_dialect('unixpwd', delimiter=':', quoting=csv.QUOTE_NONE)
with open('passwd', 'rb') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f, 'unixpwd')

Un exemple d’utilisation un peu plus avancé du lecteur — attrapant et notifiant les erreurs :

import csv, sys
filename = 'some.csv'
with open(filename, 'rb') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    try:
        for row in reader:
            print row
    except csv.Error as e:
        sys.exit('file %s, line %d: %s' % (filename, reader.line_num, e))

Et bien que le module ne permette pas d’analyser directement des chaînes, cela peut être fait facilement :

import csv
for row in csv.reader(['one,two,three']):
    print row

The csv module doesn’t directly support reading and writing Unicode, but it is 8-bit-clean save for some problems with ASCII NUL characters. So you can write functions or classes that handle the encoding and decoding for you as long as you avoid encodings like UTF-16 that use NULs. UTF-8 is recommended.

unicode_csv_reader() below is a generator that wraps csv.reader to handle Unicode CSV data (a list of Unicode strings). utf_8_encoder() is a generator that encodes the Unicode strings as UTF-8, one string (or row) at a time. The encoded strings are parsed by the CSV reader, and unicode_csv_reader() decodes the UTF-8-encoded cells back into Unicode:

import csv

def unicode_csv_reader(unicode_csv_data, dialect=csv.excel, **kwargs):
    # csv.py doesn't do Unicode; encode temporarily as UTF-8:
    csv_reader = csv.reader(utf_8_encoder(unicode_csv_data),
                            dialect=dialect, **kwargs)
    for row in csv_reader:
        # decode UTF-8 back to Unicode, cell by cell:
        yield [unicode(cell, 'utf-8') for cell in row]

def utf_8_encoder(unicode_csv_data):
    for line in unicode_csv_data:
        yield line.encode('utf-8')

For all other encodings the following UnicodeReader and UnicodeWriter classes can be used. They take an additional encoding parameter in their constructor and make sure that the data passes the real reader or writer encoded as UTF-8:

import csv, codecs, cStringIO

class UTF8Recoder:
    """
    Iterator that reads an encoded stream and reencodes the input to UTF-8
    """
    def __init__(self, f, encoding):
        self.reader = codecs.getreader(encoding)(f)

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    def next(self):
        return self.reader.next().encode("utf-8")

class UnicodeReader:
    """
    A CSV reader which will iterate over lines in the CSV file "f",
    which is encoded in the given encoding.
    """

    def __init__(self, f, dialect=csv.excel, encoding="utf-8", **kwds):
        f = UTF8Recoder(f, encoding)
        self.reader = csv.reader(f, dialect=dialect, **kwds)

    def next(self):
        row = self.reader.next()
        return [unicode(s, "utf-8") for s in row]

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

class UnicodeWriter:
    """
    A CSV writer which will write rows to CSV file "f",
    which is encoded in the given encoding.
    """

    def __init__(self, f, dialect=csv.excel, encoding="utf-8", **kwds):
        # Redirect output to a queue
        self.queue = cStringIO.StringIO()
        self.writer = csv.writer(self.queue, dialect=dialect, **kwds)
        self.stream = f
        self.encoder = codecs.getincrementalencoder(encoding)()

    def writerow(self, row):
        self.writer.writerow([s.encode("utf-8") for s in row])
        # Fetch UTF-8 output from the queue ...
        data = self.queue.getvalue()
        data = data.decode("utf-8")
        # ... and reencode it into the target encoding
        data = self.encoder.encode(data)
        # write to the target stream
        self.stream.write(data)
        # empty queue
        self.queue.truncate(0)

    def writerows(self, rows):
        for row in rows:
            self.writerow(row)